Any person who makes everyone happy is not real, and the Mandela that does so is not the real Mandela but the one the world has constructed, removing the parts of the man some people did not like.

Many use this Mandela to project themselves as real defenders of his legacy while not living according to his values and disregarding what he stood for.

Like hypocrites in religion, they only extract what makes them happy from Mandela and disregard the rest.

It is an image of a very liberal Nelson Mandela who expected South Africa to be perfect within a very short space of time.

It’s an image of a man who is a messiah, who delivered freedom and democracy to South Africa single handedly.

This cropped out image of Mandela from the real one is ingrained in the minds of those who resist transformation and economic freedom of black people Mandela fought for.

These anti-transformation, anti-justice and very ignorant people use this image to protect what they have.

They easily tell people to “get over apartheid” which Mandela spent his life fighting against.

gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 
Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 
According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 
People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 
Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 

Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 

According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 

People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 

Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

ifimeanalottoyou:

Drugs Under The Microscope

For things to reveal themselves to us, we need to be ready to abandon our views about them.
The Government Just Took a Huge Step in Rolling Back the War on Drugs

In one fell swoop, the War on Drugs got a little less punitive.

A new ruling from the U.S. Sentencing Commission means that nearly half of all federal drug prisoners can apply for reduced sentences, according to Vox. The change affects more than 46,000 inmates.

Why it happened

(Source: micdotcom)

There exists a sub-section of men who literally cannot sit through a discussion of structural misogyny without receiving constant and emphatic reassurance that no one is accusing them personally of being a misogynist. This is a derail and an attempt to shut down debate. Because, to quote “Sometimes, it’s just a cigar”:

“Suppose you disagree with women about whether rape is part of the structure of our society, used to reinforce patriarchy. Do you make that debate possible by standing on your wounded pride, and just insisting that the debate must start with a disclaimer that says you’re not a rapist? Forgive me, but that’s nothing more than narcissism.”

The conviction that you have never participated or been complicit in structural misogyny is dubious to say the least, no matter what your gender. But even if you are resolute that you, personally, have managed to transcend the system you were born and raised in and now stand as a shining beacon of gender equity outside the mire of patriarchy? Good for you, but structural misogyny still exists and we still need to have a conversation about it. If you think you have nothing to learn, go play elsewhere on the internet.

Under colonial constructions of beauty and desire, being fat and brown and queer and femme means being ugly. It means feeling unlovable, being unlovable, and no one disagreeing. Being fat and brown and colonized means to value, desire, and prioritize romantic love—a love that doesn’t want you, that will never have you, and to not know how to liberate yourself from the belly of that beast.

Ugly is how I move through the world, how I am viewed by strangers, coworkers, potential lovers, employers, family, community members, doctors, professors, service industry workers, et cetera, and this perception affects how I am treated daily. I have been denied job opportunities because of my body. I do not fit into restaurant booths, airplane seats, or school desks comfortably—which serves as a constant reminder that this world was not built to accommodate me.

futurejournalismproject:

Summer Reading from The New Yorker

The New Yorker is opening up its Web site for the next few months, letting visitors read everything currently being published — along with archives back to 2007 — for free.

The move comes alongside a site redesign.

Via The New Yorker:

Beginning this week, absolutely everything new that we publish—the work in the print magazine and the work published online only—will be unlocked. All of it, for everyone. Call it a summer-long free-for-all. Non-subscribers will get a chance to explore The New Yorker fully and freely, just as subscribers always have. Then, in the fall, we move to a second phase, implementing an easier-to-use, logical, metered paywall.

Images: Twitter posts from The New Yorker… and an ellipsis for good measure.

There’s no point to a guy yelling, “Hey sexy baby” at me out of the passenger window of a car as it speeds past. Even if I was into creepy misogynists and wanted to give him my number, I couldn’t. The car didn’t even slow down. But that’s okay, because he wasn’t actually hitting on me. The point wasn’t to proposition me or chat me up. The only point was to remind me, and all women, that our bodies are his to stare at, assess, comment on, even touch. “Hey sexy baby” is the first part of a sentence that finishes, “this is your daily message from the patriarchy, reminding you that your body is public property”.
animalwelfarists:

Owners warned of dangers of open windows
by Rachel Grafton
With temperatures set to soar even higher this weekend, Blue Cross is issuing a warning to pet owners of the dangers of open windows after 22 cats were injured by falls in just one month.
Despite the belief that they always land safely on their feet, the force at which cats land can cause massive internal and facial injuries and sadly, cats do not always survive.
Mark Bossley, head vet at Blue Cross animal hospital in Victoria, says: “Each year we see a number of cats like Chloe who have sustained injuries due to falling out of open windows.”
One such unfortunate moggy is three-year-old Chloe (pictured) who was rushed to Blue Cross’ Victoria animal hospital after she fell from a seventh floor balcony in London.
She was treated for a split palate and bruising to her legs. This meant she was unable to eat properly for a week and struggled with walking.
Luckily Chloe is recovering well at home, but some inquisitive cats suffer much more serious injuries after falling from great heights.
Mark adds: “It is important for owners to remember that although cats have tremendous agility, accidents can happen and these types are more common that people might think. In some cases there is nothing we can do and the cat passes away.”
To keep your cat safe in this hot weather, Blue Cross is urging owners living above the ground floor to keep their pets away from open windows and balconies, or to cover open windows with a mesh screen to stop curious cats from falling out.

animalwelfarists:

Owners warned of dangers of open windows

by Rachel Grafton

With temperatures set to soar even higher this weekend, Blue Cross is issuing a warning to pet owners of the dangers of open windows after 22 cats were injured by falls in just one month.

Despite the belief that they always land safely on their feet, the force at which cats land can cause massive internal and facial injuries and sadly, cats do not always survive.

Mark Bossley, head vet at Blue Cross animal hospital in Victoria, says: “Each year we see a number of cats like Chloe who have sustained injuries due to falling out of open windows.”

One such unfortunate moggy is three-year-old Chloe (pictured) who was rushed to Blue Cross’ Victoria animal hospital after she fell from a seventh floor balcony in London.

She was treated for a split palate and bruising to her legs. This meant she was unable to eat properly for a week and struggled with walking.

Luckily Chloe is recovering well at home, but some inquisitive cats suffer much more serious injuries after falling from great heights.

Mark adds: “It is important for owners to remember that although cats have tremendous agility, accidents can happen and these types are more common that people might think. In some cases there is nothing we can do and the cat passes away.”

To keep your cat safe in this hot weather, Blue Cross is urging owners living above the ground floor to keep their pets away from open windows and balconies, or to cover open windows with a mesh screen to stop curious cats from falling out.